THAT FLICKING SUBBUTEO

 

The following is an extract from Ger McCarthy’s book ‘Off Centre Circle’ about a life growing up dreaming, playing and eventually reitiring from football. This chapter deals with the author’s fascination with Subbutteo.

 “About a week ago I bought Nintendo Wii FIFA 08 for me and my son to play. It’s a brilliant game. I’ve bought a few computer football games in my time, but I’ve never played them like I used to play Subbuteo.”
David Baddiel (writer and comedian) from the book Teenage Flicks: Memories of the Sub-beautiful Game by Paul Willetts

In the late 1980’s I co-founded and helped the first Clonakilty Subbuteo league get off the ground. Subbuteo was, simply put, table football.

Eleven mini-plastic figurines of players in kits and team strips from every corner of the world were flicked around a felt pitch using your index finger. The players, complete with semi-spherical bases, were moved forward at mini-footballs around a green felt pitch with two plastic goals at either end.

Goalkeeper figurines were different in that they had a stick attached to the back of their base allowing them to move left or right to try and save any shots. There was even a rule book to govern the correct approach to playing the game:

“Flicking of Figures: Only the nail part of the forefinger or index finger shall be used to strike the base of the team figure. It is not allowed to flick any other part of the figure apart from the base.”

 

A Christmas television advertising campaign depicting two young boys playing Subbuteo with a full range of accessories caught the imagination of all the youths in the West Cork area in the late 1980’s.

The advert contained a stadium, floodlights and even an electronic scoreboard. This meant there would have to be yet another soccer related item on the McCarthy Christmas wish list.

The Subbuteo World Cup Box-Set Edition duly arrived on the morning of December 25th. The box-set displayed Brazilian international Zico curling a free kick over an Italian defensive wall from the 1982 World Cup in Spain. The box-set contained a scoreboard (not electronic though),  a surrounding fence for the felt pitch, the Mexican and Italian national teams as well as two tango world cup footballs.

I remember the excitement of trying to open my new Subbuteo set of teams and struggling to put the goals and fences together in a rush to begin flicking. One important point my brother and I had failed to consider before asking Santa for the Subbuteo set was the fact we didn’t have a hard surface big enough to attach the felt pitch to.

This meant curling up the four corners of the playing surface to accommodate the rest of our family and allow them to shuffle in and out of the living room on Christmas day. It quickly became apparent over the holiday period that many of my friends were also lucky enough to receive similar box-sets as Christmas presents.

It was decided at a hastily convened meeting to organise a local Subbuteo League and Cup competition.

I went on to claim a league and cup double in the inaugural season thanks to the many hours of practice on my home pitch ‘White Hot Lane’ which doubled as the mat in front of our living room fireplace.

The Subbuteo table football game provided countless hours of fun and enjoyment including travelling to away game at friend’s houses and Cup finals with crowds of up to ten to fifteen fans.

There were plenty of arguments in the opening Clonakilty Subbuteo season as individuals struggled to stick to the strict guidelines set out in the official rule-book. Appointed referees had a tough time judging what was a ‘push’ and what was a ‘flick’.

Another annoying tactic used by players in the inaugural season was to grab their goalkeeper (who unlike all the other figures had a long piece of plastic sticking out of his back) and throw the goal to one side just before his opponent was about to shoot for goal. Cue instant arguments and a penalty-flick being awarded to the attacking player.

Judging whether the goalkeeper moved before the penalty-flick had been taken resulted in volleys of abusive verbal’s between the two participants. Use of bad language and trying to put your opponent off became something of an art form:

Player1: “Ref he pushed that. No way was that a flick.”

Ref: “Play on.”

Player2:”Ah shut up will ya and get on with the game (lightly flicks a defending Subbuteo player with his baby finger.”

Player1: “REF? That’s a free-flick. For feck sake he can’t do that!”

Ref: “Play on.”

 

Player2: “Looks like your defenders are asleep today ha-ha I’m clean through on goal now sure.”

Player1: “Shut your hole. Go on take your best shot. You’ll miss anyway if you shoot like you do in training.”

 Player2: “This will be as easy as score as your sister.”

 Player1: “TAKE THAT BACK… Ref make him take that back.”

 Ref: “Play on.”

 

(Player2 shoots while Player1 remonstrates with the referee and scores).

 Ref: “Goal.”

 Player1: “WHAT? How can you allow that after what he said about my sister ya tool? (throws players, pitch and glass of water off the table in disgust).”

 Ref: “Game abandoned.”

 

The game of Subbuteo has evolved since its humble beginnings and you can now purchase playing pitches complete with crowd sound effects and even transferable faces of famous footballers. The McCarthy collection of Subbuteo teams grew over the years and thanks to the use of tipex my brother Aidan and I were able to doctor the Italian team to look like Blackburn, the Mexican team to look like Celtic and the Arsenal team to look like Charlton. (What Spurs fan would want an Arsenal Subbuteo team?)

Sellotape was also an essential item in any Subbuteo player’s kit bag. Years of wear and tear would result in arms and legs of the figurines cracking off. Even our dog would take to grinding its teeth on the heads of some unfortunate players which resulted in a small ball of sellotape replacing the skull of Argentina’s striker. He looked more like the Elephant man than Diego Maradonna but could still flick a decent shot at goal whenever called upon.

Nowadays children seem to spend more and more time playing computer-simulated soccer games offering realistic like movements of players and include crowd reactions and commentary. When we played Subbuteo my friends and I had to use our imagination and provide commentary and crowd effects as we went along.

It certainly provided a lot more laughs than sitting on a couch for five hours transfixed at a TV screen and moving only your thumbs.

Sometimes less is more.

 

 

 

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5 West Cork League Things To Look Forward To

5 West Cork League Things To Look Forward To
By Ger McCarthy

 

WCL

 

1. Will Drinagh heap further misery on Clonakilty AFC?

Contrasting fortunes for Clonakilty AFC and Drinagh Rangers following the first weekend of WCL Premier Division fixtures with the former suffering a hiding at Ballydehob while the latter got their campaign off to a winning start at the expense of Spartak Mossgrove.

To be fair to Clon, they always put it up to Drinagh, home and away, each season but require a full-strength line-up to prevent the visitors from making it maximum points after two games in Inchydoney this weekend.

A fixture that regularly produces plenty of goals is unlikely to disappoint on Sunday but Rangers’ ominous early season form gives the Canon Crowley Park side an excellent chance of widening the gap to the chasing pack after only two rounds of games.

 

 

2. Can Togher and Spartak get off the mark?

Newly promoted Spartak Mossgrove gave a fine account of themselves before going down 3-0 to Drinagh last Saturday and will hope home advantage is enough to see off Togher Celtic this weekend.

On the same weekend, their upcoming opponents came out the wrong end of a 2-1 result at home to Riverside, heightening the necessity to get their season up and running as soon as possible.

Neither club will want to face into round three of the Premier Division without having put some points on the board so an entertaining and open game is expected in the Convent Grounds, Bandon. If Spartak are to realise their potential as a challenger rather than a promoted team avoiding relegation then defeating an established Premier club like Togher would represent an important step in the right direction.

 

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3. Will Dunmanway get that elusive first win?

It’s not been the start the defending 2017 Premier Division champions would have wished for, losing the Michael Cronin Cup final to Drinagh on penalties before being held to a 1-1 draw by newly promoted Lyre Rovers in their league opener earlier in the week.

Avoiding defeat away to Riverside Athletic is essential on Sunday otherwise Dunmanway could find themselves playing catchup to the early season pacesetters just two weeks into the new campaign.

Sunday week’s Keane’s Jewellers League Champions first round tie away to Doolans Cow means Dunmanway will fall another game behind their title rivals so although it is early in the season, any kind of victory away to Riverside would represent a welcome boost for the Mohona side.

A word too for Lyre, who showed what they are capable of at the top level by holding champions Dunmanway Town to a draw. Rovers’ ability to pick up points against established title-challengers such as Dunmanway will go a long way to delivering a positive first season back in the top flight. Could Lyre and not fellow promoted side Spartak Mossgrove be the surprise package of 2018?

 

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4. Are Bunratty United the real deal?

Bunratty’s relegation from the Premier Division came as little surprise following the Town Park side’s poor record of one win from sixteen league games plus the worst defence in the top flight (conceding 56 goals) during 2016-17′.

Yet, United’s superb underage structure has delivered multiple successes at Schoolboys and U18 level over the past three years and some of those graduates have since emerged onto the first team, giving hope of a brighter future at junior level.

To underline that point, Bunratty made a clear statement of intent on the opening weekend of the new Division 1 season by firing seven past Durrus. A reversal of last weekend’s fixture gives an emerging United team every chance of registering another three points on Sunday. Momentum is building down in Schull.

 

 

5. Will Division 2 top of the table clashes deliver potential title-challengers?

Granted, it’s early days but the outcome of Sunday’s Sullane versus Drinagh Rangers B meeting in Coolea could yet have a big influence on the final Division 2 League standings at the end of the season.

Both sides got off to positive starts with Sullane firing six past Courtmacsherry on the same day Rangers B edged Castletown Celtic 5-4. Scoring goals shouldn’t be a problem for either side so the outcome of Sunday’s top of the table clash may depend on whoever puts in the best defensive display. A cracking game is anticipated where home advantage might edge the result in Sullane’s favour.

Aultagh Celtic and Baltimore are two other Division 2 clubs harbouring promotion aspirations and both will be eager to maintain their winning starts. Celtic defeated Castlelack last weekend while the Crabs proved too strong for Dunmanway Town B. The opportunity to accrue six points from their opening two games should guarantee an exciting encounter.

 

CastletownCeltic

 

FIXTURES

Sunday, September 3rd 2017

PremierHiSpecCars.com Premier Division
Clonakilty AFC v Drinagh Rangers at 11am
Riverside Athletic v Dunmanway Town at 11am
Leeside v Ballydehob at 2pm
Spartak Mossgrove v Togher Celtic at 2pm

OBrienWaterServices.com Division 1
Durrus v Bunratty United at 11am
Bantry Bay Rovers v Mizen AFC at2.30pm
Crookstown v Skibbereen at 2.30pm

West Cork League Division 2
Ardfield v Lyre Rovers B in Carrigroe at 11am
Aultagh Celtic v Baltimore at 11am
Castlelack v Castletown Celtic at 11am
Sullane v Drinagh Rangers B at 11am
Courtmacsherry v Dunmanway Town B at 2.30pm

7 WCL things to look forward to

7 West Cork League things to look forward to this weekend
By Ger McCarthy

 

  1. Football is back

A new West Cork League season begins this weekend with all three divisions packed full of intriguing matchups, none more so than in the PremierHiSpecCars.com Premier Division where defending champions Dunmanway Town face an early test of their credentials at home to Lyre Rovers.

Winning one title is difficult enough but defending that championship is even harder and Town will need to hit the ground running considering the wealth of talent amongst the top tier this season. Much will depend on Mark Buckley’s scoring ability but Dunmanway start as favourites.

WCL

  1. Drinagh begin their title challenge

One of the most decorated clubs in the WCL welcome Spartak Mossgrove to Canon Crowley Park on Sunday, eager to start their campaign in the best possible fashion.

Rangers have already claimed the Michael Cronin Cup following a penalty shootout victory over arch rivals Dunmanway but a sustained Premier Division title challenge requires a positive start. A big question heading into the 2017-18 season is can Drinagh turn Beamish and Parkway Cup successes into another league triumph?

drinaghrangers

  1. New boys first taste of top tier action

Spartak Mossgrove and Lyre Rovers make their 2017 Premier Division debuts away from home this weekend having both come up through Divisions 1 and 2 over the past couple of years.

Spartak have shown, in cup competitions at least, that they can challenge the established Premier clubs while Lyre possesses an emerging squad that will not be overawed by competing in the top tier.

It will be fascinating to see how both clubs fare over the next nine months and any points picked up away from home would be a welcome morale-boost on Sunday.

lyrerovers2

  1. Leeside’s greatest challenge

One of the West Cork League’s longest serving clubs face into another Premier Division campaign as one of the favourites to go down. Leeside have specialised in avoiding the drop over the past number of years but news that their Inchigeela home ground is no longer available to them comes as a serious blow on the eve of the new season. Not playing this weekend, Leeside need all the help they can get before a ball is kicked.

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  1. Can ‘the dependables’ step up to the plate?

Togher Celtic and Riverside Athletics’ opening-day meeting brings together two of the Premier Division’s most consistent and dependable clubs, the former having won last season’s Premier Cup and the latter only two seasons removed from winning the championship without losing a game.

Both sides will be without players that lined out in the previous campaign and it is a big ask for Togher and Riverside to step up and challenge the Dunmanway and Drinagh’s of the top tier. Yet, neither Celtic nor Athletic should fear anyone on their home grounds and are capable of pushing the top two before seasons end.

riversideathletic

  1. Division 1 title-race could be the best of the lot

Gaining promotion to the promised land of the PremierHiSpecCars.com Premier will be on the minds of the West Cork League’s middle tier Division 1 league clubs who start their respective campaigns this weekend.

Bantry Bay Rovers lost their top flight status following a play-off loss to Ballydehob at the tail-end of last season but a Beamish Cup final appearance at Turner’s Cross suggests the Kealkil club are capable of bouncing straight back.

Bunratty United were also relegated last term and Gabriel Rangers GAA successes has hit the Town Park club’s aspirations hard. Yet, United will still be in the mix for promotion along with a resurgent Clonakilty Town plus Skibbereen, Crookstown and Durrus sides eager for their chance to move up to the top division.

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Skibbereen
  1. Another Division 2 dogfight on the horizon

Division 2 of the WCL remains the toughest and most unpredictable league in the region. Sullane and Baltimore begin life in the bottom tier having been relegated last season and both will be anxious to go straight back up.

A victory over Courtmacsherry would represent the perfect start for the Coolea club  as would a win for the Crabs at home to Dunmanway B on Sunday. Castletown Celtic, Castlelack, Ardfield and Drinagh Rangers B are all capable of taking points off the Division 2 favourites in  another promotion race that looks like it will go right to the wire.

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Baltimore FC

 

 

Confederations Cup winners and losers

The following article was published in the Irish Examiner following Germany’s 1-0 win over Chile in the 2017 Confederations Cup decider in Russia. Published Mon July 3rd 2017. – Enjoy, Ger McCarthy.

IrishExaminer

 

WINNERS

Germany’s conveyor belt of talent

Two statistics dominated social media following Germany’s Confederations Cup final victory over Chile last night. First, the average age of Joachim Low’s starting team was 24 years and 244 days. Second and in close comparison, the German’s recent U21 European Championship final winning side’s average was 22 years and 275 days, underlining the view that a potentially dominant young squad is evolving following on from the 2014 World Cup winners’ triumph in Brazil.

 

Chilean fire

Although they came up short in the decider, Juan Antonio Pizzi’s Chilean side lit up this summer’s pre-World Cup tournament with their intricate passing, rapier-like counter-attacking and sometimes fiery reactions to match officials. 2015 and 2016 Copa America successes were built around the combined talents of Alexis Sanchez, Arturo Vidal and Eduardo Vargas but an ageing Chile squad possesses enough bite to make an impact in Russia once again next year.

 

Ronaldo

The conclusion to one of the most remarkable seasons in Cristiano Ronaldo’s distinguished career did not include a Confederations Cup medal. Instead, the Portuguese international had to be content with La Liga, Champions League, World Club Championship and European Championship successes plus the Ballon d’Or.Ronaldo still had time to help Portugal to a third-place finish in Russia before jetting off to the United States to greet the arrival of his new-born twins.

 

CastletownCeltic

LOSERS

The Russian national team

Despite running a well organised tournament, a 2-0 victory over New Zealand is all Russia’s international team had to show during an otherwise uninspiring Confederations Cup. Add to that, an ongoing FIFA investigation into allegations that Russia’s entire squad were doping at the 2014 World Cup and next year’s showpiece global event cannot come quickly enough for the host nation.

 

VAR confusion

The decision to trial FIFA’s video assistant referee technology at the Confederations Cup led to many confusing moments. Giving a referee the option to consult a VAR official or look at footage of an incident on a screen on the side of the pitch makes perfect sense, in theory. Yet, the long delays and inability of supporters or TV viewers to understand what’s going on during the decision-making process has instead, painted VAR in a negative light.

A special day for West Cork football

By Ger McCarthy

Last weekend saw Cork City FC’s home ground of Turner’s Cross host a West Cork League Beamish Cup final for the very first time. Here, Ger McCarthy reflects on an important day for football in the West Cork region as well as the West Cork Schoolboys League’s continuing rise in popularity and a cracking U14 Cup decider at the same venue.

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Irrespective of the result, last weekend’s SuperValu West Cork Schoolboys League U14 Cup decider and West Cork League Beamish Cup final showcased all that is good about football in the west Cork region.

The curtain-raiser between Ardfield and Skibbereen’s U14’s lived up to its pre-match billing with a terrific final involving thirteen Kennedy Cup squad members entertaining supporters over 70 engaging minutes.

Skibbereen’s clinical finishing proved the difference in the end, the Baltimore Road club securing a 3-1 victory plus U14 league and cup double, yet Ardfield showed why their young squad has a bright future ahead of them.

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Drinagh dominated the second half of Sunday’s Beamish Cup final yet Bantry Bay Rovers proved more than match for their opponents for much of the opening half. An inability to convert the two half-chances that came their way ultimately cost an up and coming Bay team on a day Rangers underlined their status as one of the most powerful teams in the region.

A 4-0 victory was richly deserved for a Drinagh side accustomed to taking their opportunities in cup finals over the past decade. Keith Jagoe (below) and Robert O’Regan were outstanding in the centre of the pitch and ably assisted by a livewire attack in which Gearoid White, Barry O’Driscoll (H) and Gavin Beamish shone.

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For their part and despite the loss, there is no doubt that Bay Rovers will bounce back. One or two seasons plying their trade in Division 1 will help a youthful Rovers squad find their feet once again before a quick return to the top tier of West Cork League football.

Bantry Bay Rovers could have little argument with the Beamish Cup final’s outcome though and will be disappointed at having conceded three of their four goals from set pieces. Clearly, Drinagh had their homework done and exploited a weakness in their opponents rearguard to maximum effect.

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Whilst goalscorers Barry O’Driscoll (H), Barry O’Driscoll (T), JJ Hurley and Keith Jagoe will naturally attract plenty of newspaper headlines, it is Drinagh’s defensive division that anchored the second of possibly three cup successes in 2017 for the Canon Crowley Park outfit.

Stand-in goalkeeper Rob Oldham kept a clean sheet and proved a safe pair of hands throughout the cup decider in the absence of injured Liam Cahalane. Yet, it was JJ Hurley, Barry O’Driscoll (T), JJ Collins and Darren Beamish’s composed defending that prevented a young Bay Rovers attack from finding the net.

Keith Jagoe and Robert O’Regan’s ability to shield their back four ensured there would be no Bantry Bay comeback.

Rangers are often lauded for their ability to score from multiple areas of the pitch but an experienced defence was just as important in Drinagh’s 2017 Beamish Cup success.

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Beamish Cup Final Teams

Drinagh Rangers: Robert Oldham, JJ Hurley, JJ Collins, Barry O’Driscoll (T), Darren Beamish, Robert O’Regan, Tomas Connolly, Gavin Beamish, Gearoid White, Barry O’Driscoll (H) and Keith Jagoe (captain).

Substitutes: Jamie Walsh, Shane Connolly, Adrian O’Driscoll, Stephen Crowley, Daniel McCarthy and Paraic White.

Bantry Bay Rovers: Donal Casey, Daniel Murray, Paul Drummey, Martin Hurley, Jamie McSweeney, David Daly, Brian Donovan (captain), Shane Drummey, Eoghan McElhinney, Gavin Johnson and Shane McSweeney.

Substitutes: Ciarán McElhinney, Shane Murray, Ricky Peters, Shaun O’Sullivan and Ross Leahy.

Referee: Paul McDermott. Assistant Referees: John Corcoran and Shane O’Neill. Fourth Official: Martin Coakley.

 

3 things learned from Drinagh v Skibbereen

My reaction to today’s West Cork League Parkway Hotel/Maybury Coaches Cup final between Drinagh Rangers and Skibbereen.

By Ger McCarthy

 

 

A sleeping giant shows signs of awakening

Skibbereen’s fall from grace, once one of the West Cork League’s perennial Premier Division title challengers to struggling at the wrong end of the Division 1 table, represents one of the saddest storylines in local football.

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Skibbereen

Yet, the Baltimore Road club showed enough guts and no little amount of skill in pushing Premier Division opponents and long time rivals Drinagh all the way in Sunday’s Parkway Hotel/Maybury Coaches Cup decider to suggest there is life in one of the West Cork League’s most famous clubs.

There is enough experience amongst the likes of JP Reen, James Reen and John Hodnett plus the emerging talent of Cian Coughlan to build Skibbereen’s future on.

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Yes, new blood is definitely needed but Skibbereen AFC showed with the right attitude and application that they are capable of getting back to the West Cork League’s top tier.

Skibbereen AFC’s proud football dynasty demands they should be competing amongst the region’s elite. Reorganising and recruiting make this coming off-season one of the most important in the Baltimore Road club’s history.

 

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Drinagh Rangers

Same old Drinagh, always winning

The sight of Drinagh captain Keith Jagoe holding aloft the Parkway Hotel/Maybury Coaches Cup was a timely reminder of the Canon Crowley Park side’s prowess heading towards their upcoming Beamish Cup final at Turner’s Cross.

In a season their Premier Division title hopes were crushed by local rivals Dunmanway Town, Drinagh showed they could still grind out a cup final victory rather than rely on their usual finesse.

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Barry O’Driscoll (H) and Gearoid White were both guilty of squandering multiple chances they’d normally convert.

Yet, Drinagh still managed to score the all important winner and then defend it superbly despite Skibbereen’s late onslaught before deservedly holding aloft a trophy that had previously eluded them.

What Easter Sunday’s victory showed more than anything else is that there is much work to be done ahead of their Beamish Cup decider against a younger, faster, more clinical Bantry Bay Rovers.

That will suit co-managers Don Hurley and Declan Deasy perfectly however and their experienced squad know the hard work starts this week if they are to add another trophy to the cabinet.

 

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West Cork League football in a healthy state

It was refreshing to see a large crowd at Mohona on Easter Sunday for the final of a competition that rarely attracts such interest.

Drinagh and Skibbereen supporters in attendance were treated to a tough, hard-fought encounter full of goalmouth incidents and plenty of debatable decisions.

That’s what West Cork League football is all about though. Controversial decisions as important as results, points and trophies down this neck of the woods.

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Plenty of skill on display too with Rangers’ Keith Jagoe, Barry O’Driscoll (H), Robert O’Regan and Gearoid White underlining their credentials as some of the Premier Division’s top players.

Skibbereen’s James Reen was a rock at the back while JP Reen, Cian Coughlan and John Hodnett underlined the capabilities in an engaging final.

Hopefully, more football fans will continue to take advantage of the fact they have such a talented league on their doorsteps and make an effort to support their local clubs.

Remembering Richie Conroy

The following is a feature I submitted for my weekly Evening Echo weekend  column on the decision to create a new Richie Conroy Perpetual Trophy for Post Primary schools based in West Cork. The trophy is in honour of one othe league’s most dedicated inviduals who passed away all too soon. – Ger McCarthy.

EveningEcho

 

Cork City manager John Caulfield has helped launch a new West Cork post primary schools soccer competition in honour of the late Richie Conroy.

Members of the West Cork Branch of the ISRS, Irish Soccer Referees of Ireland, West Cork League, West Cork Schoolboys League, Gateway Radio and West Cork secondary schools all came together to launch the Richard Conroy Memorial Perpetual Cup in the Arch Bar, Dunmanway last week.
Over the past few months, many of Richie’s friends and fellow referees had been looking at ways to commemorate Conroy’s many years of involvement in his beloved sport.

“Speaking with Richie’s family it was evident that they  along with all our referees were anxious to honour him as well as helping promote the game in West Cork,” said Tadg Sheehan, Secretary of the West Cork Branch of the ISRS.

WCL

“Having spoken to Pat Curran of Pobal Bheantrai we sounded out other schools and got a positive response. This cup will be an U17 post primary competition confined to West Cork schools only. The trophy has kindly been donated by the Conroy family and the competition is supported by the West Cork Branch of the ISRS, the West Cork League and the West Cork Schoolboys League.”

Five schools have entered the inaugural competition; Skibbereen, Pobal Bheantrai (Bantry), Schull, Dunmanway and Beara. It is hoped to entice other schools from within the region and possibly further afield such as Bandon, Clonakilty and Macroom in the coming years.

The draw for the first Richard Conroy Memorial Perpetual Cup has pitted Pobal Bheantrai against Dunmanway in the quarter finals with the winners advancing to a last four meeting against Schull. Skibbereen and Beara contest the second semi final ahead of the 2017 decider provisionally fixed for April 7th.

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SUPPORT
Cork City manager John Caulfield was happy to lend his support to the new competition, citing the importance of continually needing to promote the sport in an increasingly crowded sporting calendar. Richie Conroy was a person Caulfield knew well and respected throughout his early playing days and right through to becoming a League of Ireland manager.

“I was delighted to be invited to attend the launch of the Richard Conroy Memorial Perpetual Cup and helping promote soccer in West Cork,” Caulfield stated.

“It is difficult to keep the sport going in our region so I’m thankful of the huge amount of work being put in behind the scenes by a lot of dedicated people.

“Obviously, Richie Conroy was someone I knew a long, long time. During his lifetime he was a real, proud, passionate West Cork soccer man. I, like everyone else, was shocked and saddened to hear of Richie’s passing but there is no doubt he would be delighted and probably laughing to see so many people coming together to create a tournament in his honour.

“Everyone in West Cork has fond memories of Richie Conroy, a great man, a great soccer man and that is what I will always remember him as.”

Caulfield believes creating a post primary competition is a positive and necessary step in keeping soccer at the forefront of available sports, especially to U17’s.

“The fact the Richard Conroy Memorial Perpetual Cup is going to be a post primary schools competition is very important as there is a lot of work going on in trying to promote the game at that level,” admitted the Cork City manager.

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“People are well aware that summer soccer could be on the way via the West Cork Schoolboys League. Six or seven years ago it was something I wouldn’t necessarily have been in favour of. Now, I actually believe it is the right way forward because it means better pitches, longer evenings in which to get games completed and youngsters will be playing ball every week as opposed to waiting weeks after games are put off.

“I can see around the various schools in West Cork that their playing facilities are very good. Introducing this new cup, in honour of Richie Conroy, will help encourage U17’s to play and promote the game in schools which as I said earlier, is hugely important.

“The importance of playing in a post primary schools competition like this Richie Conroy Cup is vital to keep students playing at a competitive level (in school) and hopefully finding another player like Connor Ellis who came through Pobal Bheantrai and has since broken into our first team.”